STATEMENT

I graduated from the Hungarian University of Fine Arts in 2014 as a painter in the class of Orshi Drozdik. My work is conceptually motivated, well thought out, and my position is critical. I tackle ideological and public issues in a self-reflexive way. I am obsessively looking for images that clash the terrifying naturalness of death with the beauty of life we experience every day. I consciously and unconsciously depict the values of the era in which I live, which shapes me as well.
 
In my current series, I reflect on the patriarchal “warmshine” that constantly overshadows our human existence. This is becoming more and more threatening now that war is reaching our borders. The castle, a historic building fortified with walls and bastions, symbolically represents strength and power, but it embodies the strength of faith as an allegory, symbolizing the besieged lady and even desire itself.
 
As a female artist, I place an unusual focus on castles, reflecting the fact that we traditionally associate this with the male principle.
Trauma — but also secrecy — recedes and escapes the gaze, shrouded in protection, unbreakable, impenetrable, unfixed; wandering the landscape. 
 
In my previous big series, I dealt with women going to war. Defenders of the power systems in uniforms tried to fight for a common faith at a time where there is no common faith! The Syrian civil war that erupted in 2011 and its aftermath is the starting point for my paintings. A fictional world that is constantly changing protects life at the cost of other lives. In 2015, I painted landscapes, abstracted natural environments that were once battlefields, the empty landscape where no trace of human battle is visible. These are the sites of battles 1000, 100, or 10 years ago, where several thousands once died. The questions I search the answers to are whether nature can go beyond us and whether we can go beyond our own history, the destruction we are doing against our fellow human beings and our environment. In addition to the theme, varying sizes and technical innovations appeared in this series of 66 images. I continued the experience, compassion, and resentment of the images in another abstract series, on a large scale. Although I have been dealing with wars, destruction, changed roles for years, there are always new layers to get to and that I think are very important to deal with.